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Anthropology Civil Services Paper 2 Section- B, Questions 5,6_ Solutions



5. a. Regionalism as an opportunity and threat to national integration

Regionalism refers to the strong identification and loyalty towards a particular region, often based on shared cultural, linguistic, or historical factors. While regionalism can provide opportunities for the development and promotion of regional cultures and identities, it can also pose a threat to national integration. On the one hand, regionalism can be seen as an opportunity for national integration. By acknowledging and respecting regional diversity, the government can create a sense of inclusiveness and encourage a sense of national identity that embraces different cultures and traditions. Additionally, regionalism can be harnessed as a means of promoting economic development by capitalizing on local resources and strengths, creating employment opportunities, and improving standards of living. This can contribute to a more balanced distribution of wealth and reduce disparities between regions, which can in turn promote national unity and integration. On the other hand, regionalism can also pose a threat to national integration. When regional identities and loyalties become too strong, they can lead to a sense of alienation and marginalization among those who do not identify with the dominant regional culture. This can lead to conflicts and tensions between different regions, which can undermine the unity and stability of the nation. Additionally, when regionalism is associated with demands for greater autonomy or even secession, it can pose a direct threat to national sovereignty and territorial integrity. Therefore, it is important to strike a balance between acknowledging and respecting regional diversity while also promoting national integration. The government can play a critical role in achieving this balance by promoting policies that encourage inclusiveness, respect for regional cultures and identities, and equitable economic development across different regions. Additionally, education and awareness campaigns that promote a sense of national identity that embraces regional diversity can also help to counteract the divisive effects of regionalism. B. Issues of tribal agricultural laborers

Tribal agricultural laborers in India face a range of challenges and issues that affect their livelihoods, well-being, and social status. Some of the key issues faced by tribal agricultural laborers include: Landlessness: Many tribal agricultural laborers do not own land and are forced to work as laborers on the lands owned by others. This makes them vulnerable to exploitation and low wages, and limits their ability to improve their economic and social status. Low Wages: Tribal agricultural laborers are often paid very low wages, which are insufficient to meet their basic needs. This is due to a lack of bargaining power and the prevalence of informal labor arrangements, which leave workers vulnerable to exploitation by employers. Lack of Access to Credit: Tribal agricultural laborers face significant barriers in accessing credit, which limits their ability to invest in their own agricultural activities and improve their livelihoods. Poor Working Conditions: Tribal agricultural laborers often work in hazardous and difficult conditions, with little access to protective equipment or other forms of support. Social Marginalization: Tribal agricultural laborers often face discrimination and social marginalization due to their tribal identity. This can limit their access to basic services, including healthcare, education, and other forms of support. Limited Access to Government Programs: Tribal agricultural laborers often face significant barriers in accessing government programs and services, including those designed to support agricultural activities or improve their livelihoods. To address these issues, there is a need for policies and programs that focus on improving the economic and social status of tribal agricultural laborers. This can include measures to improve access to credit, support for land ownership and agricultural activities, and the provision of basic services and social protection. Additionally, efforts to promote the rights and well-being of tribal communities more broadly can also help to address the underlying social and economic factors that contribute to the challenges faced by tribal agricultural laborers. c. Major problems of nomadic and semi-nomadic groups

Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups in India face a range of challenges and problems that affect their livelihoods, well-being, and social status. Some of the major problems faced by these groups include: Landlessness: Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups do not own land and are often dependent on landowners or government land for their livelihoods. This makes them vulnerable to displacement and eviction, as well as exploitation by landowners and other powerful actors. Lack of Access to Basic Services: Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups often lack access to basic services, including healthcare, education, and sanitation facilities. This is due to their mobility and the lack of government support for their specific needs. Discrimination and Social Marginalization: Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups often face discrimination and social marginalization due to their lifestyle, culture, and occupation. This can limit their access to basic rights and services, as well as opportunities for education and employment. Vulnerability to Exploitation and Violence: Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups are often vulnerable to exploitation and violence, including human trafficking, forced labor, and other forms of abuse. Lack of Representation and Political Voice: Nomadic and semi-nomadic groups often lack representation and political voice, which makes it difficult for them to advocate for their rights and interests. To address these problems, there is a need for policies and programs that focus on improving the economic and social status of nomadic and semi-nomadic groups. This can include measures to support land ownership and access to basic services, as well as efforts to combat discrimination and violence. Additionally, there is a need for greater representation and political voice for these groups, including affirmative action and other measures to ensure their inclusion in the political process. Finally, there is a need for greater awareness and understanding of the challenges faced by nomadic and semi-nomadic groups, as well as efforts to promote greater tolerance and acceptance of their culture and way of life D. Role of the Governor in the Fifth Schedule areas

The Governor plays an important role in the administration of the Fifth Schedule areas, which are areas predominantly inhabited by tribal communities. The Fifth Schedule areas are defined in the Constitution of India and include certain areas of states such as Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Rajasthan, and Telangana. The role of the Governor in the Fifth Schedule areas is multi-faceted and includes the following: Protection of Tribal Rights: The Governor is responsible for safeguarding the rights of the tribal communities in the Fifth Schedule areas, including their land rights, cultural and social rights, and political representation. The Governor has the power to veto any legislation that may be detrimental to the interests of the tribal communities. Administration of the Schedule Areas: The Governor has the authority to administer the Schedule Areas and appoint Tribal Advisory Councils. The Governor also prepares annual reports on the administration of the Schedule Areas. Control over Local Administration: The Governor has the power to regulate the peace and good governance of the Schedule Areas and to direct and control the local administration in these areas. Promotion of Development: The Governor is responsible for promoting the economic and social development of the Schedule Areas, including providing financial assistance, infrastructure development, and other measures. Review of Administration: The Governor reviews the administration of the Schedule Areas, including the implementation of development programs, protection of tribal rights, and the functioning of the Tribal Advisory Councils. In summary, the role of the Governor in the Fifth Schedule areas is to ensure the protection of tribal rights, promote economic and social development, and oversee the administration of these areas. The Governor plays a crucial role in ensuring that the interests of the tribal communities are protected and that the development needs of these areas are met. e.Austroasiatic languages Austroasiatic languages refer to a family of languages spoken in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and parts of East Asia. This language family is one of the largest in the world, with over 100 million speakers in countries such as India, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, and China.

The Austroasiatic language family is divided into two main branches, the Munda branch and the Mon-Khmer branch. The Munda branch is mainly spoken in eastern and central India, while the Mon-Khmer branch is found in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and parts of South Asia.

The Austroasiatic languages have a complex linguistic structure with a variety of tonal systems and complex grammar. The Mon-Khmer branch is further divided into several sub-branches, including the Khmer branch, which includes the official language of Cambodia, and the Viet-Muong branch, which includes Vietnamese. Historically, Austroasiatic languages have been associated with the spread of rice cultivation in Southeast Asia. The Mon-Khmer languages are believed to have originated in the region and spread with the spread of rice cultivation.

In India, the Munda branch of Austroasiatic languages is spoken by several tribal communities, including the Santal, Mundari, Ho, and Korku. These languages have played an important role in the preservation of the cultural identity of these tribal communities and have contributed to the diversity of India's linguistic landscape. In conclusion, Austroasiatic languages form an important language family in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and parts of East Asia. These languages have contributed to the linguistic diversity of the region and have played an important role in the cultural identity of various communities. 6. (a) Discuss the objectives of Integrated Tribal Development Projects (ITDPs). How

far have these objectives been achieved?


Answer- Integrated Tribal Development Projects (ITDPs) were initiated by the government of India in the 1970s with the objective of providing comprehensive and integrated development support to tribal communities. The main objectives of ITDPs were:


Economic Development: The ITDPs aimed to improve the economic conditions of tribal communities by providing infrastructure development, promoting agriculture, and creating employment opportunities.

Social Development: The ITDPs aimed to improve the social conditions of tribal communities by providing basic health, education, and housing facilities.

Cultural Preservation: The ITDPs aimed to preserve the cultural identity of tribal communities by promoting their traditional arts, crafts, and culture.


Empowerment: The ITDPs aimed to empower tribal communities by providing them with opportunities to participate in decision-making processes and by creating awareness about their rights.

However, the achievement of these objectives has been mixed. While ITDPs have led to some positive changes in the lives of tribal communities, they have also faced several challenges in their implementation.

One of the main challenges is the lack of coordination between various departments and agencies involved in implementing ITDPs. This has led to a fragmented approach, with different departments working in isolation and failing to achieve the desired outcomes.

Another challenge is the lack of participation of tribal communities in the planning and implementation of ITDPs. This has led to a top-down approach, where decisions are made by government officials without taking into account the needs and aspirations of tribal communities.

Despite these challenges, ITDPs have had some positive outcomes. They have led to the creation of infrastructure such as roads, water supply systems, and electricity, which have helped to improve the economic conditions of tribal communities. They have also led to the establishment of schools, health centers, and other basic facilities, which have improved the social conditions of tribal communities.

In conclusion, the objectives of ITDPs were to provide comprehensive and integrated development support to tribal communities. While these objectives have been partly achieved, there are still several challenges that need to be addressed to ensure that ITDPs are successful in meeting the needs and aspirations of the tribal community.

b. Compare the functioning of the traditional 'Tribal Council' with that of 'Gram Sabha' under PESA.


Answer: Traditional Tribal Councils and Gram Sabhas under PESA are two different systems of local governance with some similarities and differences.

Traditional Tribal Councils are a form of community-based governance that has been in existence in tribal areas for centuries. They are usually led by the community's elders, who make decisions on issues such as conflict resolution, resource management, and social welfare. The council's decisions are binding and are based on the customs, traditions, and beliefs of the community.

On the other hand, Gram Sabhas under PESA are established under the Panchayat (Extension to Scheduled Areas) Act, 1996, which provides for the self-governance of scheduled areas in India. Gram Sabhas are statutory bodies that are responsible for decision-making at the local level. They are composed of all the adult members of a village and are responsible for preparing plans for economic development, social justice, and local governance.

While traditional Tribal Councils and Gram Sabhas have some similarities in terms of community-based decision-making, there are also some key differences between the two systems. One of the main differences is that Tribal Councils are often based on customary practices and are not recognized by the government, while Gram Sabhas are statutory bodies established under the law.

Another key difference is that Tribal Councils are usually restricted to tribal communities, while Gram Sabhas are open to all residents of a village, regardless of their social or economic status. This means that Gram Sabhas are more inclusive than Tribal Councils and provide opportunities for greater participation and representation of marginalized groups.

Furthermore, while Tribal Councils are often based on oral traditions and have limited documentation, Gram Sabhas are required to maintain detailed records and documentation of their decisions, plans, and activities.

In conclusion, while Tribal Councils and Gram Sabhas under PESA share some similarities in terms of community-based decision-making, there are also significant differences between the two systems. Gram Sabhas, being statutory bodies, have a more formalized structure and are more inclusive than Tribal Councils. Gram Sabhas also have a greater emphasis on documentation and transparency in their decision-making processes.

c. Explain how British policies impacted the major resources of the tribals.


Answer- British policies had a significant impact on the major resources of tribal communities in India. The British colonial administration viewed natural resources such as forests, land, and minerals as valuable assets that could be exploited for their economic benefit.

Forests were a major resource for tribal communities, providing them with food, fuel, and medicinal plants. The British introduced forest laws and regulations, such as the Indian Forest Act of 1878, which declared all forests as state property and restricted access to forest resources. These laws limited the traditional practices of shifting agriculture, hunting, and gathering, which were essential for the survival of tribal communities.

The British also introduced commercial forestry, which involved the cultivation of timber and other forest products for export. This led to the displacement of tribal communities from their traditional lands and forced them to move to other areas.


Land was another major resource for tribal communities, as it was essential for their agriculture and livelihoods. The British introduced the concept of private property and land ownership, which conflicted with the traditional communal land ownership practices of many tribal communities. The British also introduced revenue laws, which required the payment of taxes on land, making it difficult for tribal communities to retain their lands.

Minerals such as iron, coal, and bauxite were valuable resources that the British exploited for their economic benefit. Mining operations often displaced tribal communities and destroyed their lands and forests. Tribal communities were often not consulted or compensated for the loss of their resources and livelihoods.

Overall, the British policies impacted the major resources of tribal communities in India by restricting access to forests, introducing private property and land ownership, and exploiting minerals for economic gain. These policies often led to the displacement of tribal communities, the destruction of their lands and forests, and the loss of their traditional practices and livelihoods.



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