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IES ISS 2023 GENERAL ENGLISH QUESTION SOLVED WITH PROPER DETAILS FOR QUESTIONS- 4, 5, 6



4. Use the following words, each in a single sentence. Bring out the meaning clearly without changing the form of the word. No credit will be given for a vague or ambiguous sentence.

a. Altercation

b. Blatantly

c. Cacophony

d. Delirious

e. Invigorate


a. Altercation: The heated altercation between the two drivers escalated into a shouting match, with angry gestures and exchanged insults.


b. Blatantly: The politician blatantly disregarded the facts, making false claims during the televised debate.


c. Cacophony: In the bustling market, the cacophony of voices, honking horns, and clattering carts created a chaotic symphony of sound.


d. Delirious: After days of high fever, the patient became delirious, muttering incoherently and experiencing vivid hallucinations.


e. Invigorate: The brisk morning jog invigorated her senses, filling her with renewed energy and a sense of vitality.


5. Use the following idioms and phrasal verbs in sentence, so as to bring out their meaning clearly:

a. a pinch of salt

b. down the alley

c. at an arm’s length

d. under the cloud

e. in the eye of the storm


a. a pinch of salt: When reading news articles online, it's essential to take sensational headlines with a pinch of salt and verify the information from reliable sources.


b. down the alley: As a lover of classic literature, reading Jane Austen's novels is right down my alley.


c. at an arm's length: Due to their past conflicts, the two colleagues kept their professional relationship at an arm's length, avoiding personal interactions.


d. under the cloud: The company's reputation remained under the cloud after the scandal, causing a decline in investor confidence.


e. in the eye of the storm: Despite the chaos surrounding her, she remained calm and composed, as if she were in the eye of the storm.


6. Correct the following sentences without changing their meaning. Do not make unnecessary changes in the original sentence:


a. It is a matter of gravest importance.

b. He was hankering for success.

c. Neither she comes nor she writes.

d. Too many a roadblock can be very frustrative for drivers.

e. The contents of the box was an enigma for everyone.

f. We were happy to see acres and acres of expensive lush green field.

g. Even though this pen cost me dearly, it is value for money.

h. Everyone must bide by the rules of the game.

i. Your lack in clarity of thought can be detrimental to your welfare.

j. He coaxed me to agree with his proposal.


a. It is a matter of the gravest importance.

Explanation: The article "the" is needed before "gravest" to make it grammatically correct.


b. He was hankering after success.

Explanation: The preposition "after" should be used instead of "for" after the verb "hankering" to express the desired action.


c. Neither does she come nor does she write.

Explanation: The auxiliary verb "does" is needed before "she" in both clauses for correct subject-verb agreement.


d. Too many roadblocks can be very frustrating for drivers.

Explanation: "Frustrating" should be used instead of "frustrative" to properly convey the intended meaning.


e. The contents of the box were an enigma for everyone.

Explanation: Since "contents" is a plural noun, the verb "were" should be used instead of "was" to agree with the subject.


f. We were happy to see acres and acres of lush green fields.

Explanation: The plural form "fields" should be used instead of "field" to match the plural noun "acres."


g. Even though this pen cost me dearly, it is good value for money.

Explanation: The phrase "good value for money" is a more idiomatic expression to convey the intended meaning.


h. Everyone must abide by the rules of the game.

Explanation: The correct spelling of the word is "abide," which means to comply with or follow.


i. Your lack of clarity of thought can be detrimental to your welfare.

Explanation: The preposition "of" should be used after "lack" to indicate what is lacking.


j. He coaxed me into agreeing with his proposal.

Explanation: The preposition "into" should be used after "coaxed" to indicate the desired action of agreeing.





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